Day-3: When in Yogya [part-1: walking around the town] 👣

Day-3: When in Yogya [part-1: walking around the town] 👣

Wednesday, 19th Feb 2020, very hot morning!!

After having a gloomy day on Tuesday, we got a suuuuper hot day this morning! And with that, we can follow our itinerary as planned! ヽ( ⌒o⌒)人(⌒-⌒ )ノ

We were still twinning out with our hats. And yes that was the batik I bought yesterday! ╰(*´︶`*)╯♡

We had about 12 stops today, so I have to separate them into 2 parts, like yesterday. Cyn agreed with the route I proposed. Our first stop was Taman Sari Water Castle. We called grab to pick us up before 9 in the morning.

Located near the Keraton, this place was also known as the garden for the Sultan of Yogyakarta. Tamansari was originally built for multiple purposes yet now only several buildings remain. Some of its original functions were a place to rest, to meditate, to work, to hide and to defend the Sultan’s family.

Taman Sari Water Castle ꦠꦩꦤ꧀ ꦱꦫꦶ
Address: Wisata Taman Sari Jalan Tamanan, Patehan, Kecamatan Kraton, Kota Yogyakarta
Phone No.:
Opening time: 6AM to 3PM
Entrance fee: IDR 5,000 (for local) IDR 15,000 (for international)


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Day-2: When in Yogya [part-2: City Tour in The Afternoon] ☔

Day-2: When in Yogya [part-2: City Tour in The Afternoon] ☔

Tuesday afternoon, 18th Feb 2020, cloudy and rainy.

We are now heading to Prambanan Temple,  which is about 1 hour away from the previous castle. Same as the previous temple we visited, I’m sure there are price difference between local tourists and international tourist. We did buy the combined ticket back in the first temple. So here me and Cyn just walked our way through the non-queuing ticket counter. Yes, the temple wasn’t so busy, probably because we visited during daytime and was not in any holiday. There were few students having a study tour, a group of Korean tourists, two Japanese ladies and us. (๑˃ᴗ˂)ﻭ

Did you know, this temple is the largest Hindu temple of ancient Java, and the first building was completed in the mid-9th century. It was likely started by Rakai Pikatan as the Hindu Sanjaya Dynasty’s answer to the Buddhist Sailendra Dynasty’s Borobudur and Sewu temples nearby. Historians suggest that the construction of Prambanan probably was meant to mark the return of the Hindu Sanjaya Dynasty to power in Central Java after almost a century of Buddhist Sailendra Dynasty domination. ヽ(・ω・)ノ

Candi Prambanan ꦕꦤ꧀ꦝꦶ​ꦥꦿꦩ꧀ꦧꦤꦤ꧀
Address: Jl. Raya Solo – Yogyakarta No.16, Kranggan, Bokoharjo, Kec. Prambanan, Kabupaten Sleman, Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta
Phone No.: +62 274 496401
Opening time: 6AM to 5PM
Entrance fee: IDR 40,000 (for local tourist, adult!)
Culture: Hinduism

Candi Prambanan

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Pokarekare Ana (Māori Love Song) 💌

Pokarekare Ana (Māori Love Song) 💌

This is based on the best early account of the story sourced from Sir George Grey’s ‘Polynesian Mythology’, first published in 1855.

Hinemoa was the daughter of a great chief who lived at Owhata, on the shore of Lake Rotorua. She was very beautiful, and because of her beauty and her high rank, many young men desired her as a wife. One of these was Tutanekai, but he knew that though he was of good birth, his rank was not high enough for Hinemoa’s father to accept him as his daughter’s suitor.

So for a long time Tutanekai hid his love. He saw Hinemoa only when there were great meetings of the tribe, for his home was far across the water, at Mokoia Island in the middle of the lake.

When the people gathered together he would content himself with gazing at Hinemoa from a distance, and yet it seemed to him that sometimes she would return his looks. But he thought to himself, ‘There are many other young men more worthy than I of winning Hinemoa’s heart. If I approach her to declare my love, perhaps she will be displeased.’ Read more

Who is Princess WenCheng (文成公主)

Who is Princess WenCheng (文成公主)

Princess Wencheng (Tibetan: Mung-chang Kungco; Chinese: 文成公主; pinyin: Wénchéng Gōngzhǔ; Wade–Giles: Wen-ch’eng Kung-chu; 620s – 680/2), surnamed Li, was a member of a minor branch of the royal clan of the Chinese Tang dynasty. Much of her life has been mythified and used for propaganda purposes. However the story of Princess Wencheng and Songtsän Gampo has been cherished by the Tibetans and the rest of the Chinese people ever since. As historical record is sketchy, most what is known about the story is legendary.

Princess Li Wencheng was the most famous and beloved queen in Tibetan history, alongside with Princess Bhrikuti for Nepal. In 641, this beautiful and intelligent princess Wencheng was granted by Emperor Taizong of Tang to King Songtsän Gampo of Tibet for an involuntary act of the emperor’s heqin (marriage alliance) policy, when she was still very young. She is popularly known in Tibet as Gyasa, or “Chinese wife”. She brought the Tibetans many of the scientific and agricultural advances of the Tang dynasty and is also credited with the introduction of Buddhism into the region. It was a famous peace-making marriage in the Tang Dynasty.

Nowadays, the statues of Princess Wencheng and Songtsän Gampo are still in the Jokhang Monastery. Songtsän Gampo had the Ramoche Monastery built for the Buddha statues that Princess Wencheng had brought with her. The princess herself also had the Jokhang Monastery built, and in front of it she and Songtsän Gampo planted some willow trees now known as tangliu (the Tang willow). Today, the original statue of Sakyamuni believed to be brought by Princess Wencheng is still enshrined in the center of the main hall of the Jokhang Monastery. The chamber where they spent their first married life is still kept intact in the Potala Palace.

Songtsän Gampo died in 650 when he was only thirty-four years old, while the Princess lived as a widow in Tibet for another 30 years until her death, and never returned to China. Generation after generation of poets have written numerous verses to eulogize her. Her story was adapted to various theatrical forms. Two traditional observations have been devoted to her: the fifteenth day of the fourth month of each Tibetan year (the day when Princess Wencheng arrived in Tubo) and the fifteenth day of the tenth month of each Tibetan year (the birthday of Princess Wencheng). When the days come each year, the Tibetan people will turn out in their best costumes to sing and dance to commemorate her.

Click here to know more about The Tale Of Princess WenCheng (Bridging The Two Cultures).